Max Birk University of Saskatchewan

Max Birk is a PhD Student at the University of Saskatchewan. His research evolves around the psychological concept of the self, focusing on implications for player experience research and game design, e.g., modeling motivation and engagement. Max studied at the University of Trier, Germany; for his thesis he researched the physiological and endocrinological effects of videogames in a stress lab. Working in psychophysiology, experimental psychology, games user research, and human-computer-interaction, Max has a variety of experience, all connected by his interest in games. He has consulted for several indie game companies and served on the CHI PLAY 2015 and CHI 2014 and CHI 2016 WIP PCs.

Max Birk, Dipl.-Psych.
Department of Computer Science
University of Saskatchewan
110 Science Place,
Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9
Tel: +1 306 966 2327
LinkedIn

Publications

Crowdsourcing Player Experience Evaluation
Birk, M., Mandryk, R. (2016), GDC Games User Research Summit 2016, San Francisco, CA, USA.
How Self-Esteem Shapes our Interactions with Play Technologies
Birk, M., Mandryk, R., Miller, M., Gerling, K. (2015), The ACM SIGCHI Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play (CHI PLAY), London, UK. 35-45. Honourable Mentions (top 5%).
The Effects of Social Exclusion on Play Experience and Hostile Cognitions in Digital Games.
Birk, M., Buttlar, B., Bowey, J., Poeller, S., Thomson, S., Baumann, N., Mandryk, R. (2016), In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'2016), San Jose, CA, USA. 3007-3019.
Fostering Intrinsic Motivation through Avatar Identification in Digital Games
Birk, M., Atkins, C., Bowey, J., Mandryk, R. (2016), In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI'2016), San Jose, CA, USA. 2982-2995.
Manipulating Leaderboards to Induce Player Experience
Bowey, J., Birk, M., Mandryk, R. (2015), The ACM SIGCHI Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play (CHI PLAY), London, UK. 115-120. Best Paper (top 1%).
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Research

Affective Computing
Evaluation of a user's emotional experience with technology is not well understood, especially when the primary goal of a technology is to entertain (e.g., computer game) or to invoke an emotional experience (e.g., animated film).