Publication: Trust Me: Social Games are Better than Social Icebreakers at Building Trust

Interpersonal trust is one of the key components of efficient teamwork. Research suggests two main approaches for trust formation: personal information exchange (e.g., social ice- breakers), and creating a context of risk and interdependence (e.g., trust falls). However, because these strategies are diffi- cult to implement in an online setting, trust is more difficult to achieve and preserve in distributed teams. In this paper, we argue that games are an optimal environment for trust for- mation because they can simulate both risk and interdepend- ence. Results of our online experiment show that a social game can be more effective than a social task at fostering interpersonal trust. Furthermore, trust formation through the game is reliable, but trust depends on several contingencies in the social task. Our work suggests that gameplay interac- tions do not merely promote impoverished versions of the rich ties formed through conversation; but rather engender genuine social bonds.

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Participants

Ansgar Depping Regan Mandryk
University of Saskatchewan
Colby Johanson
University of Saskatchewan
Jason Bowey
Shelby Thomson

Citation

Depping, A.E., Mandryk, R.L., Johanson, C., Bowey, J.T., Thomson, S. 2016. Trust Me: Social Games are Better than Social Icebreakers at Building Trust. In CHI PLAY '16: Proceedings of the 2016 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play.

BibTeX

@inproceedings {404-p116-depping,
author= {Ansgar Depping and Regan Mandryk and Colby Johanson and Jason Bowey and Shelby Thomson},
title= {Trust Me: Social Games are Better than Social Icebreakers at Building Trust},
booktitle= {CHI PLAY '16: Proceedings of the 2016 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play},
year= {2016}
}