Publication: Quantifying Individual Differences, Skill Development, and Fatigue Effects in Small-Scale Exertion Interfaces

Game mechanics in sports video games for skills like running and throwing are nothing like those skills in real sports. Adding small-scale exertion to the control scheme - using small muscle groups such as hands and fingers - can re-introduce some degree of physicality into sports video games. However, there is little quantitative knowledge about how small-scale exertion affects individual variability, skill development, or fatigue - and how it compares to traditional game mechanics. We carried out two studies to provide this quantitative information. Our studies showed that controlling movement with small-scale exertion was significantly and substantially different from rate-based control, and that both movement and passing skills showed significant increases with practice. Our work provides valuable information that can help designers decide when and how to use small-scale exertion, and provides an empirical basis for the design of new game interaction techniques.

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Participants

Mike Sheinin Carl Gutwin
University of Saskatchewan

Citation

Sheinin, M.S., Gutwin, C. 2015. Quantifying Individual Differences, Skill Development, and Fatigue Effects in Small-Scale Exertion Interfaces. In Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play (CHI Play 2015), ISBN 978-1-4503-3466-2. 57-66. DOI=10.1145/2793107.2793129.

BibTeX

@inbook {434-quantifying-individual,
author= {Mike Sheinin and Carl Gutwin},
title= {Quantifying Individual Differences, Skill Development, and Fatigue Effects in Small-Scale Exertion Interfaces},
booktitle= {Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play (CHI Play 2015)},
year= {2015},
pages= {57-66}
}