Publication: Using Positive or Negative Reinforcement in Neurofeedback Games for Training Self-Regulation

Neurofeedback training can reduce symptoms related to epileptic seizures, attention deficits, and Asperger's Syndrome, and often uses games to motivate participation over the long term needed to see improvements. Most neurofeedback games use negative reinforcement to guide players -- i.e., a barrier to progressing in the game is removed when players achieve a desirable state -- which is considered to be less effective than reinforcing behaviour through positive feedback when players do well. We investigate whether using positive reinforcement is more successful than negative reinforcement through the design and evaluation of the experience and efficacy of a custom neurofeedback training game. We showed that positive reinforcement was more effective in encouraging players to keep their brain activity regulated. Furthermore it generated more positive affect and motivated more investment of effort in players, suggesting that positive reinforcement in neurofeedback games may provide a better and more effective neurofeedback training experience.

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Participants

Anke Reinschlüssel Regan Mandryk
University of Saskatchewan

Citation

Reinschlüssel, A., Mandryk, R.L. 2016. Using Positive or Negative Reinforcement in Neurofeedback Games for Training Self-Regulation. In Proceedings of the 2016 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play, Austin, TX, USA. 186-198. DOI=10.1145/2967934.2968085.

BibTeX

@inproceedings {524-p186-reinschluessel,
author= {Anke Reinschlüssel and Regan Mandryk},
title= {Using Positive or Negative Reinforcement in Neurofeedback Games for Training Self-Regulation},
booktitle= {Proceedings of the 2016 Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play},
year= {2016},
address= {Austin, TX, USA},
pages= {186-198}
}